Peterson, Rosenberg PLLC
Attorneys At Law
   
Estate Attorneys Serving Colorado and the Rocky Mountain Region

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Estate Planning

Estate planning is the process of helping clients to develop and implement a strategy for passing assets to individuals and charities they  choose—either during lifetime or at death.  Many people think of estate planning as a will.  That’s often true, but estate planning also can require powers of attorney and attention to beneficiary designations for life insurance and retirement benefits.  Some clients may need living trusts, Medicaid planning, estate tax planning strategies or trusts for children, grandchildren or disabled beneficiaries.  Others may need to address the special needs of blended families, non-citizen spouses, lifetime gifts and business succession planning.  Our goal is to tailor estate plans to meet the client’s needs, whether it’s a simple will or something much more complex.

 

Estate and Trust Administration 

When a person dies, his or her property passes according to a will or living trust, beneficiary designations or the terms of state law.  We assist personal representatives (“executors") and trustees with their duties and provide valuable information to heirs and beneficiaries about their rights and responsibilities.  We can produce and file routine paperwork typical of estate administration.  For larger estates, we prepare and file estate tax returns, supervise business transitions, handle disputed claims and supervise asset transfers.  We also can assist trustees who are administering trusts for living individuals and beneficiaries who have questions or concerns about trust management.

 

Estate Litigation

Sometimes, disputes arise about the validity of wills or trusts, or how to interpret them.  Families may be divided on who should serve as guardians or caregivers for elderly, disabled parents.  When an incapacitated person’s assets disappear without explanation, family members often suspect each other, an agent acting under power of attorney or a caregiver with access to financial assets and information.  Colorado law provides a number of forums and remedies in such cases. Our practice seeks to resolve these issues through settlement first, but litigation if necessary.